Activities

There was an assortment of activities available either through the American Community or on the local German economy.

The Germans had an assortment of trails leading through the woods. These trails included fitness trails. (Hiking or running trails that had physical activities along the route to be used.). Going on Vollkesmarches became a past time that many Americans enjoyed.

Indoor swimming pool, opened in the mid 1970's (Courtesy Stadt Oberursel date of picture unknown)

The Germans had a public swimming pool in Oberursel, within walking distance of Camp King. They had both indoor and outdoor pools. These pools were Olympic sized and very well maintained. Going to the pool was an inexpensive way to spend a day.

Outdoor Pool. The large building in the background is the Panorama Hotel.(Courtesy Stadt Oberursel date of picture unknown)

When it snowed, Camp King was an ideal place to live. The terrain of the small hill provided an excellent opportunity for sledding. This past time, although fun, was somewhat dangerous. At the bottom of the hill, there was a drainage ditch that ran the entire length of the hill. More than a few dependents were unable to stop their sleds before crashing into the ditch. (Usually there were only minor injuries; however, on at least one occasion it resulted in a child having to be hospitalized and have surgery.)

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The Hill, Chapel in the background,  where most of the kids went sledding. (Courtesy of  Barry Friedman)

There were many local restaurants and bars. There was no "legal minimum Drinking age." Many Americans enjoyed the German beer, clubs, and hospitality. The food and drink were excellent.

The Germans also have a tradition called Fasching. Fasching could be equated to our Halloween; however, there are major differences. Fasching lasts a lot longer and ended with parades. Again the American Community was invited by the German people to participate in their tradition.

One of the most special days on Camp King was German American days. Once a year the post would open its doors to the German people. Tanks, helicopters and other military equipment would be brought to the post for display. A carnival atmosphere evolved, as there were activities set up for all to enjoy. There were games for kids as well as adults. The German people would come to our post and experience the American way of life.

The Camp King Chiefs, the older dependent team (Courtesy of Jeanne Price, Taken in 1970)

Sports were a big part of dependent and military life. The military had interunit competitions in baseball and basketball. The dependents had football, baseball, and basketball teams that competed with other military dependents within the Frankfurt American Military Community. The sports activities for dependents were usually provided through the Dependent Youth Activities Center. Coaches were volunteers. There were two sets of teams for each sport delineated by age.

Dependent Baseball Game played on the Multi-purpose purpose field. (One of the barracks on the lower portion of the post can be partially seen on right, the Movie Theater is next to the barracks, the Mess hall is the furthest building on right. The Public Affairs Building can be seen in the background.) (Courtesy of Ricky Andresen picture taken in the early to mid 1970’s)

Scouting was a big part of dependent life on Camp King. It had both Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. The Boy Scouts had troop 43. Just like in the United States they went camping a lot. There was access to many camps. The biggest, which was also the summer camp, was Camp Freedom. The troop also ventured into Switzerland to go to camp at Kandersteig, an International Scouting Camp as well as backpacking through Sweden. Scouting was encouraged and highly supported by the military. Transportation and other support services were provided by the military, when possible. For many years the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts would hold Christmas tree sales. They would go to a tree farm, cut trees down and sell them for a dollar a foot. As cub scouts and Weblos the scouts participated in pinewood derbies and other normal scouting activities. There were also German Nationals as well as Americans who were not military sponsored who participated in scouting.

 Members of Troop 43 at Kandersteig. (Picture courtesy of Richard Collins taken circa 1978)

Girl Scout Troop (Picture taken circa 1970 courtesy of Jeanne Price)

There was Vacation resorts maintained by the Armed Forces Recreation Services Europe. The two major ones in Germany were Lake Chiemsee and Garmisch. Military personnel and their dependents could go to these facilities, hotels or campgrounds, and vacation. These allowed for a relatively inexpensive vacation. The facilities offered a variety of activities such as skiing and boating. Both of these facilities where located in Southern Germany in the vicinity of Munich. Many Americans took advantage of the travel opportunities

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PROLOGUE  

PRIOR TO WORLD WAR II1936-1939

WORLD WAR II "DULAG LUFT" 1939-1945

POST WORLD WAR II (1945-1953)

The Gehlen Organization

AMERICAN MILITARY UNITS (1953-1995)  

PHYSICAL PLANT  

 SCHOOLS

THE FRANKFURT AMERICAN MILITARY COMMUNITY  

ACTIVITIES

EMPLOYMENT TELEVISION, RADIO AND THE STARS AND STRIPES NEWSPAPER

POST SECURITY, LAW ENFORCEMENT AND TERRORISM

THE PEOPLE AND CITY OF OBERURSEL  

POST CLOSURE AND FUTURE

FIS'ERS